I am no longer a Sikh after a lifetime of studying it

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I am no longer a Sikh after a lifetime of studying it

Postby JaspreetS013 » Wed May 01, 2019 11:55 am

Hello all!

I just wanted to share my experience with Sikhism. After a lot of experience with Religion and studying various faiths, I am now a Atheist and believe this to be the best path in life.

At one time I used to wear a Turban, recite Japji sahib in the morning, have unshorn hair etc. I wasn't baptized but there was a good chance I would be baptized one day. 

Sikhism teaches a lot of good things. There is absolutely no doubt about this. Sikhs showed bravery, I love the concept of langaar and many other things Sikhs do or have done. 
However, the more I thought about it the more I realized that it follows the same formula as any other Religion (though I'll admit it's a lot better than some religions like Islam).
- Just like most other religions there is a strict dress code. Recently I took a white friend of mine to the Gurudwara and he was scared to go in. He asked me why he had to cover his hair, why he had to remove his shoes. I told him it is to show respect! But come on now.. 

- There were no Women Sikh Gurus and even today some Gurudwaras don't allow Women to do service. This is just like any other religion where Women are not considered equivalent to men. I know there are verses in Guru Granth
Sahib Ji where women are elevated but actions speak louder than words.

- Why wear a Turban, grow long hair? It is completely based on blind faith. There is no scientific or good reason to have long hair or to wear a Turban. It appears completely cultural and serves no purpose in the 21st Century.

- Many people including myself have to face a lot of abuse from their family and relatives when they cut their hair. I was called Mona, manmukh etc. by my family. This is like all other religions where the person is guilted for leaving that group. Sounds almost like a cult! It's not as bad as Islam though where your head is cut off for being a apostate.

- Guru Granth Sahib Ji is said to be divinely inspired but there are no Real scientific passages in there which proves this. For instance, if it mentioned the age of Earth or some scientific discovery which was not yet discovered, that would definitely be a good reason to believe its divinity.
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Re: I am no longer a Sikh after a lifetime of studying it

Postby JeejaJi » Thu Jul 18, 2019 8:43 pm

Why do you think Sikhism follows the same blind faith? Just because many of the practitioners today have diverted from its true meaning, does not mean that you have to adapt to them.

You don’t have to grow hair or wear a turban to be true Sikh. Just like guru Nanak or all other gurus before tenth guru or Bala or Mardana were any less Sikhs than the ones that Guru Gobind Singh ji baptized and called Khalsa.

Try to understand the real meaning of Gurbani and then practice that. Ignore all the other crap about it. I still don’t have all the answers but still searching and seeking...
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Re: I am no longer a Sikh after a lifetime of studying it

Postby Guest » Fri Aug 09, 2019 7:29 pm

JaspreetS013 wrote:Hello all!

I just wanted to share my experience with Sikhism. After a lot of experience with Religion and studying various faiths, I am now a Atheist and believe this to be the best path in life.

At one time I used to wear a Turban, recite Japji sahib in the morning, have unshorn hair etc. I wasn't baptized but there was a good chance I would be baptized one day. 

Sikhism teaches a lot of good things. There is absolutely no doubt about this. Sikhs showed bravery, I love the concept of langaar and many other things Sikhs do or have done. 
However, the more I thought about it the more I realized that it follows the same formula as any other Religion (though I'll admit it's a lot better than some religions like Islam).
- Just like most other religions there is a strict dress code. Recently I took a white friend of mine to the Gurudwara and he was scared to go in. He asked me why he had to cover his hair, why he had to remove his shoes. I told him it is to show respect! But come on now.. 

- There were no Women Sikh Gurus and even today some Gurudwaras don't allow Women to do service. This is just like any other religion where Women are not considered equivalent to men. I know there are verses in Guru Granth
Sahib Ji where women are elevated but actions speak louder than words.

- Why wear a Turban, grow long hair? It is completely based on blind faith. There is no scientific or good reason to have long hair or to wear a Turban. It appears completely cultural and serves no purpose in the 21st Century.

- Many people including myself have to face a lot of abuse from their family and relatives when they cut their hair. I was called Mona, manmukh etc. by my family. This is like all other religions where the person is guilted for leaving that group. Sounds almost like a cult! It's not as bad as Islam though where your head is cut off for being a apostate.

- Guru Granth Sahib Ji is said to be divinely inspired but there are no Real scientific passages in there which proves this. For instance, if it mentioned the age of Earth or some scientific discovery which was not yet discovered, that would definitely be a good reason to believe its divinity.



Issues you mentioned:
-To show respect: taking off shoes and covering head.
-Turban:
-Keeping hair:
-Cutting hair guilt:
-Science:


Science: there are some things science can never prove. There are things science can't explain. Religion has aspects science can never touch, for some aspects... science is astonished. When there are miracles they can't explain for example.

Keeping hair: Sikhism promotes keeping the body as it's given. It promotes natural beauty, keeping your body the way it was given. Embracing yourself and how you were created. Every feature God gave you including your hair. You are respecting God by keeping care of what he/she gave you. Having a turban again is taking care of hair but also a symbol of Sikhism.

As for those who guilt you: This is a cultural issue as how people treat you. Some people may keep hair and not show values of Sikhism that matter...they do things that are bad karam. Some may not keep hair but show good karam. Sikhs don't shun anyone if a fellow is not Sikh or claims to be Sikh and is not practicing Sikhi exactly like them.

Covering head, taking off shoes: Shoes are dirty. Our temples are clean, they are a holy place. So yes, we take off shoes to show respect for our temple. Covering head is a sign of respect as well.

Alot of these I just thought of and also did some quick research. You claim you have studied for a long time, but it doesn't seem like it, no offence. I suggest you talk to others, and not let bad experiences phase you. Read more online or books to get a real understanding of true Sikhi and values Sikhism upholds. Focus on Sikhism values please!


Here is some answers from a quick Google search to show you what I mean:

QUORA: Divjot Singh, works at FORCE - Forum Of Computer Engineering
Answered Sep 27, 2015
The answer has something to do with the science behind covering our head in Sikhism. Guru Gobind Singh Ji ordered their devotees to keep their heads covered all the time wearing a turban (to the girls too). The science behind that being:
1. It conserves brain's energy. So more energy means a sharper mind.
2. This keeps dirt and filth away from our heads.
Apart from these two scientific reasons there are another reasons of covering the head.
1. The turban is our crown and a symbol of us, SINGH'S, royalty.
2. Keeping the head covered shows modesty, that someone else is more powerful and respectable than us. God being the supreme, our heads need to be covered all the time in order to pay the respect.
Thus, the most prominent reason for covering the heads in Gurudwara is respect.
Actually, as per the order of Guruji, the devotees must never cut their hair and must cover it all the time. For the Sikhs who cut their hair and then keep it covered when they go to Gurudwara Sahib , i would say that it is of no use. There is no point following a little rule (covering the head) if you cant follow the bigger one (not cutting the hair).
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Re: I am no longer a Sikh after a lifetime of studying it

Postby 1jyot2moorti » Tue Aug 13, 2019 5:40 am

You were never a Sikh to begin with, because you were afraid of your identity in the first place. All your diatribes and fulminations are proof in that direction.

Read the response by Sher-Lock in this post:
https://www.quora.com/Do-Sikh-girls-rea ... -Sikh-boys

Gurbani is not jaap, it is about ingesting its meaning for daily life. You would have done better, had you read a Japji Sahib translation and imbibed it for life, than reciting it daily like a parrot.
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